Make your own free website on Tripod.com
Home | Spectroscopy Lab | Conservation of Mass Lab | Measurement Lab | Study Skills | Lab Safety | Redox Equations | College Prep | Lavoisier | Ice Cream Lab | Iodine Clock Lab | Plagiarism Statement | Favorite Links | Chemistry Photo Album | My Resume | Chemistry Notes and Helps | Absolute Zero Lab | Ionic Compounds Lab | Lab Report Rubric and guides | Molecular & Electron Geometry | Mole Stuff
What College Professors Expect
Chemistry Materials from Ray Tedder

From a survey of college professors:

This table and analysis section is in The Journal of Chemical Education, October, 2003 in an article "What Should We Teach in High School Chemistry?" by Kelly Deters.

Table 4: RESULTS.  College professors chose their top five topics/skills that students need when they come into their college chemistry courses.  See Table 1 for the description of each topic as it appeared on the survey.

Topic

Percent of participants rating topic in their top five

Basic skills

82

Moles

58

Dimensional analysis

56

Stoichiometry

55

Naming/Writing formulas

55

Atomic Structure

44

Balancing equations

44

Lab skills

24

Periodic table

24

Solutions and concentrations

21

Process skills

20

Classification of matter

18

Types of reactions

7

Gases

5

Equilibrium (qual)

5

History

3

Acid/base (simple)

2

Enthalpy

2

Kinetics (qual)

1

Acid/base (complex)

0

Kinetics (quant)

0

Equilibrium (quant)

0

 Analysis

For each topic, the percentage of professors including that topic in their top five was calculated.  Topics were analyzed for statistical significance between topics using analysis of variance (ANOVA).  The null hypothesis was rejected and the Newman-Keuls procedure was used to determine which topics had statistically significantly higher percentage of votes than other topics (16).  The top seven topics were statistically significantly higher ranked than the other topics.  Table 4 displays the results of the analysis. 

                Topics that participants included in the other category included: bonding (types and characteristics), Lewis Dot Structures, writing skills, examining the plausibility of answers, connections between the macro/micro worlds, connections to their real-life, and descriptive chemistry.  Statistics were not calculated on the frequency of these comments, as it can not be determined how many people would have chosen them in their top five if they had been listed on the survey.
 
Reprinted by permission of author.

Enter supporting content here